Wednesday, February 25, 2015


Man to Man: Heart to Heart

Roosevelt a long-time smoker, had a heart attack at age 45. He endured six surgeries, including heart bypass surgery to fix the damage to his heart caused by smoking. Now smoke-free, Roosevelt encourages others to quit smoking as a way to reduce their risk of heart disease.

"A heart attack feels like a hand inside squeezing your heart," he said. "It's like the worst Charley horse you can imagine—in your heart."

About 1 in 5 African American adults smokes cigarettes.5 CDC's Tips from Former Smokers campaign recently shined a spotlight on this statistic and the links between smoking and heart disease among African American men.

"If you have loved ones who care about you, they will support you. Take it one day at a time," Roosevelt said.

This approach can work not only for people who want to quit smoking, but for those who are trying to eat better, exercise, and control their high blood pressure—all ways to help reduce the chances of heart attack and stroke. A strong support system[649 KB] also helps.

African American Men: Take Note

While heart disease doesn't discriminate, your gender, race, ethnicity, and where you live can increase your risk. African American men are at the highest risk for heart disease. About 2 in 5 African Americans have high blood pressure, but only half have it under control.3 A recent article in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine also showed that Americans aged 30 to 74 who live the Southeast—specifically, Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Georgia—are at higher risk of developing heart disease over the next 10 years than people who live in other parts of the country.4 Many of these states have a large African American population.

Resources to Help You and Your Loved Ones Make Control the Goal

More information about high blood pressure is available at CDC's High Blood Pressure website. In addition, the following resources are available to help you and your loved ones make control your goal:

Tuesday, February 24, 2015


Make Control Your Goal

If you know you have high blood pressure, take these steps to help get it under control[1.16 MB]:Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be. Set a goal to lower your pressure with your doctor and talk about how you can reach your goal. Work with your health care team to make sure you meet that goal. Track your blood pressure over time. One way to do that is with this free wallet card[920 KB] from Million Hearts®.

  • Take your blood pressure medicine as directed. Set a timer on your phone to remember to take your medicine at the same time each day. If you are having trouble taking your medicines on time or paying for your medicines, or if you are having side effects, ask your doctor for help.
  • Quit smoking—and if you don't smoke, don't start. You can find tips and resources at CDC's Smoking and Tobacco website.
  • Reduce sodium intake. Most Americans consume too much sodium, which can raise blood pressure. Read about ways to reduce your sodium and visit the Million Hearts® Healthy Eating & Lifestyle Resource Center for heart-healthy, lower-sodium recipes, meal plans, and helpful articles.
     
    Center for Disease Control and Prevention
    CDC 24/7:Saving Lives, Protecting People
     

Monday, February 23, 2015



February is Heart Month
 
Make Blood Pressure Control Your Goal
This American Heart Month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Million Hearts®–a national effort to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes in the United States by 2017–are encouraging Americans to know their blood pressure, and if it's high, to make control their goal.
Uncontrolled high blood pressure[469 KB] is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure.1 People with high blood pressure are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke and 3 times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.2
High blood pressure often shows no signs or symptoms, which is why having your blood pressure checked regularly is important. It's easy to get your blood pressure checked. You can get screened at your doctor's office and drugstores or even check it yourself at home, using a home blood pressure monitor.
 
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
CDC 24/7:  Saving Lives, Protecting People


Thursday, February 19, 2015



Measles
From January 1 to February 13, 2015, 141 people from 17 states & Washington DC were reported to have measles.  80% of these are part of a large, ongoing multi-state outbreak linked to Disney Land.  There are currently no confirmed cases of measles in WI but most of the states around WI have at least 1 case of measles.



Measles is a highly contagious disease, 90% of unvaccinated people who are exposed to measles will develop the disease. 
Click here for an animation on how measles outbreaks spread in vaccinated and unvaccinated populations.
The symptoms of measles generally appear about 7-14 days after a person is infected.  Individuals are considered infectious 4 days before symptoms appear and for 4 days after the rash starts.  Symptoms of meals typically start with high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis).  Two or three days after symptoms begin, tiny white spots may appear inside the mouth.  A rash breaks out three to five days after symptoms begin. 
Measles can be serious in all age groups.  However, children younger than 5 years of age and adults older than 20 years of age are more likely to suffer from measles complications.  Common measles complications include ear infections and diarrhea.
  • Ear infections occur in about one out of every 10 children with measles and can result in permanent hearing loss.
  • Diarrhea is reported in less than one out of 10 people with measles
    Some people may suffer from severe complications, such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). They may need to be hospitalized and could die.
  • As many as one out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children.
  • About one child out of every 1,000 who get measles will develop encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can lead to convulsions and can leave the child deaf or with intellectual disability.
  • For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die from it.

Measles may cause pregnant woman to give birth prematurely, or have a low-birth-weight baby.

Measles can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine.  One dose of MMR vaccine is about 93% effective at preventing measles if exposed to the virus, and two doses are about 97% effective. CDC recommends all children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Children can receive the second dose earlier as long as it is at least 28 days after the first dose. Students at post-high school educational institutions who do not have evidence of immunity against measles need two doses of MMR vaccine, separated by at least 28 days. Adults who do not have evidence of immunity against measles should get at least one dose of MMR vaccine.